Friday, February 8, 2013

Khajuraho

Khajuraho, famous for sexually explicit sculptures on temple walls, has many other beautiful temples. Of a total of eighty five, only around twenty two are in reasonably good condition now and Khajuraho has the stamp of a UNESCO World Heritage Site now. The temples date back to 950 – 1050 AD.


As you near the famed city you will be surrounded by ‘Guides’ who promise to show you all that is there in Khajuraho. But very few of them are authorized to enter the Western group of temples complex where all the prominent temples are. They will only guide you to the Eastern, Southern and Jain group of temples. So if you are going to hire a guide please keep this in mind.

In the morning we covered the Eastern, Southern and the Jain temples and in the evening we did the Western group. The ‘Eastern’ ‘Southern’ and ‘Western’ refer to the direction in which they are situated as all these temples are in an area of around six kms.


Our first visit was to the Vamana temple in the Eastern zone. It is dedicated to Vamana incarnation of Lord 



Vishnu. It has beautiful carvings on the outer walls.


The next stop was Javari temple that is dedicated to Lord Vishnu built during 1075 and 1100AD. There is a 




headless idol inside the temple.


Then we went on to the Chaturbhuj temple, dedicated to Lord Vishnu, which dates back to 1100AD. This is 


the only temple in Khajuraho that lacks erotic sculptures. It is located in the Southern zone.




We moved on to the Duladeo temple next, dedicated to Lord Shiva, that dates back to early 12th century.
The Jain temples were next.



 Adinath temple dating back to the latter part of the 11th century AD and the



 Parshavnath temple built during the 10th century AD.


Then we moved to the temples in the Western zone. The first temple we saw there was the Lakshaman 


temple dedicated to Lord Vishnu, built between 930-950 AD.


Opposite the Lakshmana temple is the Varaha mandir. Varaha is an incarnation of Lord Vishnu.



The Kandariya Mahadeva temple, dedicated to Lord Shiva, built between 1025-1050 AD is the largest 



monument in Khajuraho.


The Jagdambi temple was originally dedicated to Lord Vishnu now named Jagdambi for the image of Parvati 


enshrined in the sanctum.



The Chitragupta temple resembles the Jagdambi temple, and is dedicated to Surya.


The Vishwanatha temple dedicated to Lord Shiva, built in 1002AD is one of the finest in Khajuraho.


Khajuraho is not only about erotic sculpture but also about fine architecture and exquisite artisanship.
  
Getting there:

By Air: Khajuraho airport is well connected to all major cities in India, like Delhi, Mumbai, Varanasi, Bhopal, Indore and Allahabad.


By Rail: Nearest railway station to Khajuraho is Mahoba which is around 77 km from Khajuraho. Harpalpur is another station that is well connected to most of the major cities in India and is 90 km from Khajuraho
  
By Road: Khajuraho is one of the cities well connected by public and private buses. Private tour service operators arrange deluxe AC and Non AC buses to Khajuraho from various cities including Jhansi (177 km) and Delhi (594 km).

36 comments:

  1. Wow! That is virtual tour of khajuraho. Where ever you go to see such carved temples, this place of temples of Cchitorgargh of Rajathan, faceless and limbless idols make me sad, We couldn't protect them, from weather, time and invasions.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Wow. Beautiful pictures. And nice tips about the guides and stuff. I am not a very heritage site visiting person - but this felt like a place I should experience for myself too!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you. Deepa, the ambiance there is worth a visit!

      Delete
  3. Hi,
    A great collage of exquisitly carved temples in Khajuraho. Our ancient heritage sites speak volumes about the grandeur of our culture which loud mouthed in the political and social arena are trying to sideline.

    ReplyDelete
  4. These temples are beautiful and famous all over the world. have seen some post but not as comprehensive and picturesque like you . It was eye pleasing post . Would like to go here one day. Thanks for sharing.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you Vishal. Pleasure to share.

      Delete
  5. Great pictures, and a grand post, Deepak!
    Had been there some 15 yrs back!
    As always, the place looks more beautiful in your photos than in reality!!

    ReplyDelete
  6. Thanks for the historical and virtual tour of the ancient architecture.

    ReplyDelete
  7. such amazing architecture!! it's hard to believe those were built 1000 years ago!! very informative post and wonderful photographs as usual. the information about tourist guides would be really helpful for those who are planning to visit that place.

    ReplyDelete
  8. A very fascinating place to be in..... Thanks for this nice post.......

    http://debnature.blogspot.in

    ReplyDelete
  9. Wow...the pictures talked a lot! Thanks for sharing

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you Ranjana. Pleasure to share!

      Delete
  10. Well written and lovely pictures... You remind me my time in Khajuraho...

    ReplyDelete
  11. Awesome virtual tour of Khajuraho temples. Lovely post!

    http://rajniranjandas.blogspot.in/2013/02/welcome-to-benares.html

    ReplyDelete
  12. Wow! Two eyes are not sufficient to appreciate the beauty of this temple. How intricate and detailed each temple is. You've captured them really well.

    ReplyDelete
  13. Beautifully captured. In fact during the last decade I have visited this place not less than 30 times and used to stay either in the Circuit House or MP Tourism hotels. I became so much bored that I started finding pleasure in visiting Sneha falls, Chandranagar and Pandav falls/tree houses nearby.

    ReplyDelete
  14. Its really a poetry on stone. Nice collection of pics.

    ReplyDelete
  15. Very nice photos of the khajuraho.

    ReplyDelete
  16. Superb work! That's the best photographic description of the Khajuraho, I've seen till now.
    I have a suggestion for you and hope that you won't mind.
    Although, you're a much experienced blogger than I am, still, I'd like to suggest what I felt about your blog. Please keep your textual content and pictures separate. Inserting pictures, in between paragraphs of text, to me, doesn't look like a cool idea, as it simply obstructs the flow of reading.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you CyberKid.
      The reason I insert pictures in between the text is to give a pictorial reference to the text.
      Shall give a thought to your suggestion. Thank you.

      Delete
  17. You are indeed very blessed to have visited such interesting places. Your photography is perfect. Its poetry in stone.

    ReplyDelete
  18. i think we saw khajuraho from your eyes....even if i dnt get a chance to visit this place, atleast i will have the fabulous pics taken here...kudos!

    www.trip-o-graphy.blogspot.in

    ReplyDelete
  19. Beautiful temples and thanks for the pictures and the tours you give to all the places you've visited!

    ReplyDelete